Farai's blog

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About

Farai has combined media, technology, and socio-political analysis during her 20-year career as an award-winning author, journalist, professor, and lecturer. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. She was also a spring 2012 fellow at Harvard’s Institute of Politics. She frequently …

Book a Lecture or Event

Since 1995, when she began appearing on cable news as an analyst for CNN, Farai Chideya has given thousands of speeches and hosted hundreds of events. Her bookings have included Ivies Harvard and Yale, large state universities and regional colleges, events at the United Nations and on Capitol Hill, and …

One with Farai

Podcasts with global visionaries.

Post-Post Racial

Another post-racial America moment: small-town law enforcement called the President the N word; refuses to apologize. I am noodling over the idea of doing a 20th anniversary edition of my book Don’t Believe the Hype, on race/politics/culture/media. I am not depressed about race relations today; rather, I think we have another chance to turn the lens on ourselves and examine our incredible capacity for perpetuating stereotypes. What the past 20 years have taught me, among many things, is that no legal equality alone produces societal equality. We as humans have to change. How? For one, we better get over the concept of being post-racial, posthaste.

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May 16, 2014 Blog No Comments

The Act of Killing: Syria, and Our Moral Dilemma

Thich Nhat Hanh and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thich Nhat Hanh and Martin Luther King, Jr.

This weekend I went to a lecture by Thich Nhat Hanh, an author and Buddhist teacher who, among many things, encouraged Rev. Martin Luther King to take a stand against the Vietnam War. That war was vastly different from any possible U.S. engagement in Syria, but at the end of the day, all warfare comes down to killing – killing as an act of aggression, and killing as an act of indirect mercy, when perpetrators of a greater violence are eliminated. Even many Buddhist teachings, which generally forbid killing, acknowledge that a moral circumstance may

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September 7, 2013 Blog No Comments

The Gun Bone’s Connected to the Jobs Bone, and Other Surprising and Unpleasant Truths About American Politics

Today is a big day in the gun debate. Entities from the NRA to Walmart and Hollywood executives are converging on the White House to speak with Joe Biden in a series of meetings whose tonality will likely range from “don’t blame me” to “the heck with you.” After all, the NRA has added 100,000 members since the massacre of 20 children and six adults in Newtown, Connecticut.

via MSNBC.com

Remember that song Dry Bones?

The knee bone connected to the thigh bone,
The thigh bone connected to the back bone,
The back bone connected to the neck bone

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January 10, 2013 Blog No Comments

Disadvantage Black? Race, Politics, and Gun Reform

President Barack Obama has weathered two seasons of thinly-veiled racial attacks, apparently a standard part of what it takes to be elected President if you’re black. Before he took office in January 2009, there was a run on guns, sparked in part by the head of the NRA arguing that the President wanted a total ban. (That was factually incorrect.)

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December 15, 2012 Blog No Comments

Audacious Politics: Marijuana

If the New York Times runs an Opinionator column called “Give Pot a Chance,” chances are things are changing in America… though not necessarily the way people assume. The column’s argument calls on President Obama to legalize marijuana and have, as its kicker states, some “backbone.” While that’s one take on the matter, the political math is that a white libertarian-leaning Republican President (someone like former Republican New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson

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November 23, 2012 Blog No Comments

Podcast

Bigger Than Technology: An Interview with Joi Ito on One with Farai

21 Aug 2014

Joi Ito, director of the MIT Media Lab, explains how a sense of play and experimentation inform their cutting-edge work. As a child, Joi Ito went back and forth between Japan and US cities, including Detroit, forging an international identity; a fascination with technology; and also for community. He explains how passions …

Living History, Exploring Nature: An Interview with Betty Reid Soskin on One with Farai

15 Aug 2014

At 92, Betty Reid Soskin is the oldest full-time National Parks service ranger, teaching about racial and gender equality as well as nature. National Parks ranger Betty Reid Soskin has worked for women’s and civil rights; run a “race record” music store; and now helps tell the history of gender and industry …

Music (and Dance) for All: An Interview with Bill Bragin on One with Farai

8 Aug 2014

Bill Bragin, the director of public programming for the famed Lincoln Center, on bringing free and adventurous music, dance, and art to all. Farai Chideya speaks with Bill Bragin, the Director of Public Programming for Lincoln Center, about what it takes to bring great music and art to crowds for free… and also …

Equality — A Survivor’s Guide: An Interview with Urvashi Vaid on One with Farai

1 Aug 2014

Activist Urvashi Vaid talks about how LGBT politics relate to other rights struggles, plus her journey surviving two rounds of cancer. Farai Chideya speaks with Urvashi Vaid, author of books including “Virtual Equality” and a professor at Columbia Law School. Born in India, raised in America, she details how LGBT issues connect …

First Nations Filmmaking: An Interview with Bird Runningwater on One with Farai

25 Jul 2014

Bird Runningwater of the Sundance Institute on innovations in Native and indigenous film. Farai Chideya speaks about the work of the Sundance Institute — the mentoring, training, and career-building sister to the Sundance Film Festival — with its Native American and Indigenous Program Director, Bird Runningwater.

Digital Diplomacy and Global Economy: An Interivew with Alec Ross on One with Farai

18 Jul 2014

Author and former U.S. diplomat Alec Ross on globalization Alec Ross helped define “digital diplomacy”, and logged nearly a million air miles for work — as Senior Advisor of Innovation to then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He talked with Farai Chideya about technology and the future of globalization.