Category: Voter Behavior

OBP: Mental Health Impacts on Mothers & Children During the Pandemic, Voting Rights Under Threat, and the Benefits of Being Outdoors

This week, I welcomed the co-hosts of The Double Shift podcast, Katherine Goldstein and Angela Garbes (pictured above), on Sippin’ the Political Tea to talk about the impact the pandemic had on moms’ mental health, and how they can begin to recover. New York Times Opinion columnist Jamelle Bouie shared his views on the latest voting rights legislation, and why he decided to take full parental leave this year for the birth of his second child. Dr. Miguelina Germán, a child behavioral health specialist, gave an overview of how children have fared this past year, and what we have to look forward to with schools reopening. And camp counselor and Black Outside director Angelica Holmes shared her personal and professional experience with the benefits of outdoor activities for Black girls.

OBP: Why the Tulsa Massacre Matters Today, the Insurrection as White Supremacist Backlash, and Tackling Algorithmic Bias

This week, I welcomed Trymaine Lee (pictured above) of MSNBC’s podcast “Into America” to talk about his coverage of the centennial of the Tulsa Massacre. Social justice advocate Tamika Mallory shared her family’s legacy of activism in her new book, “State of Emergency.” OBP tech contributor Mutale Nkonde of AI for the People explained why we’re more aware of disinformation and misinformation after January 6th, and what her organization is doing to combat algorithmic discrimination. On Sippin’ the Political Tea, I went through the most important news of the week with contributors Errin Haines of the 19th and Jess Morales Rocketto of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.

OBP: How Racism is at the Root of White Evangelical Power, Why Child Care is also Necessary Infrastructure, & Practical Advice for Securing Your Finances

This week I spoke with Dr. Anthea Butler (pictured above), professor at the University of Pennsylvania, about the role white evangelical Christians play in maintaining racist systems in the U.S. Girls Who Code founder Reshma Saujani shared why she started the Marshall Plan For Moms, to support working mothers trapped by poor child care systems and the Covid-19 financial fallout. Documentary filmmaker Loira Limbal talked about her movie “Through the Night,” which profiles families that run and utilize a 24-hour daycare center. I also welcomed Michelle Singletary, personal finance columnist at the Washington Post and author of the new book, “What To Do With Your Money When Crisis Hits,” and Nathalie Molina Niño, managing director at Known Holdings, to Sippin’ the Political Tea, for a roundtable dedicated to securing your finances post-Covid.

Our Body Politic: A Conservative on Rejecting Trumpism, Why the Global Vaccination Push Must Continue, and Making Sense of Infighting Amongst Republicans

This week I spoke with political advisor and long-time conservative Tara Setmayer (pictured above) on repudiating Donald Trump from the beginning, and where she fits in our divided body politic. Valerie Jarrett, Board Chair of the non-profit Civic Nation, shared what they’re doing to get more disproportionately impacted people vaccinated. Our public health contributor Dr. Kavita Trivedi returned with an update on what to do and not do once you’re vaccinated. And I welcomed Errin Haines of the 19th and Jess Morales Rocketto of the National Domestic Workers Alliance for a round of Sippin’ the Political Tea all about the week’s news.

Our Body Politic: Senator Mazie Hirono Tackles Anti-Asian Hate Crimes from the Senate, the Supreme Court Rules on Minors in Prison, and What the World Thinks of the U.S. After Trump

This week I spoke with Senator Mazie Hirono of Hawai’i (pictured above) about opposing Donald Trump vociferously, her bill to tackle anti-Asian hate crimes, and her new memoir. Our Body Politic legal analyst Tiffany Jeffers explained the Supreme Court’s latest decision on life imprisonment for minors, and updates Farai on voting rights across the country. Dr. Jenn Jackson and Dr. Diane Wong, research analysts at the GenForward Survey, discussed what makes good data, and what sets their survey apart. And I welcomed Errin Haines of the 19th and Karen Attiah of the Washington Post to Sippin’ the Political Tea for a roundtable focused on international news.Senator Mazie Hirono Tackles Anti-Asian Hate Crimes from the Senate, the Supreme Court Rules on Minors in Prison, and What the World Thinks of the U.S. After Trump.

Our Body Politic: How History Books and Monuments Shape our National Narrative, Preparing for the Next Pandemic, and Practical Advice on Staying Safe During Police Encounters

This week Farai Chideya looks at what makes it into our history books—and why—with New York Times investigative journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of the 1619 Project. Then she talks with poet and philanthropist Elizabeth Alexander about how monuments and public spaces also shape our historical narrative. Dr. Mary Bassett of Harvard University shares what she thinks it will take to truly address healthcare inequities laid bare by Covid-19, and how that would prepare us for the next epidemic. And the weekly roundtable Sippin’ the Political Tea welcomes special guests Kyhisha Zebley, a police sergeant in Philadelphia, and Gabriela Mejia, an anti-harassment advocate at the organization Hollaback!, to talk about how to be a safe and effective bystander during encounters with police.

Our Body Politic: DC Statehood Back in Play, Why National Security Risks Need Reassessing, and Looking Back on 100 Days of Biden-Harris Administration

This week I spoke with DC Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (pictured above) on why she’s fighting to make DC a state. Public opinion researcher Tresa Undem shared how attitudes about race, gender, and power influenced voters in 2020. Retired Major General Linda Singh of the National Guard talked about how the insurrection on January 6th highlighted the need to focus on domestic terrorism, and discussed the role of law enforcement in social-justice protests. On Sippin’ the Political Tea, contributors Errin Haines of the 19th and Jess Morales Rocketto of the National Domestic Workers Alliance joined me in taking stock of the first 100 days of the Biden-Harris administration.

OBP: Samaria Rice on the Chauvin verdict, White House correspondents Yamiche Alcindor and April Ryan on holding the powerful accountable, and the latest on Covid-19 Vax for kids.

This week I spoke with Samaria Rice (pictured above), mother of Tamir Rice and founder of the Tamir Rice Foundation, on what justice looks like to her. Our Body Politic contributor Dr. Kavita Trivedi reminded us how to keep children safe until they’re eligible for Covid-19 vaccines. PBS NewsHour White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor reflected on the responsibility of covering whoever is in power. And The Grio’s April Ryan joined our Sippin’ the Political Tea roundtable to analyze this week’s news.

OBP: Rep. Val Demings on combatting domestic terrorism, an entrepreneur & a policymaker on social equity in cannabis industry, and why #OscarsSoWhite still applies today.

This week I spoke with Congresswoman Val Demings (pictured above) about Donald Trump’s first impeachment trial, the continued threat of domestic terrorism, and her thoughts on George Floyd’s murder as a former officer of the law. Cannabis entrepreneur Khadijah Adams talked about what it would take to give people of color an equal opportunity in the industry they helped create. And Dianna Houenou of New Jersey’s Cannabis Regulatory Commission shared what it means to work for social equity in the state’s new cannabis marketplace. Plus, on our weekly roundtable, Sippin’ the Political Tea, Farai welcomed business of entertainment contributor Casey Mendoza and #OscarsSoWhite founder April Reign to talk about what the latest awards nominations say about inclusion in Hollywood.

OBP: A Congresswoman addresses Black maternal death; A study shows why Black women die from Covid-19 more; A seasoned immigration reporter joins roundtable.

This week I spoke with Representative Lauren Underwood (pictured above) about how the federal government can tackle the Black maternal health crisis. Dr. Rachel Hardeman of the Center for Antiracism Research for Health Equity explained why she focuses on the impact of racism on health. Farai shared the latest findings that Black women are over three times more likely to die of Covid-19 than white men or Asian men in two U.S. states. And we learned about Dr. Justina Ford, a Black doctor in the 1900s who served patients of color in Denver. On Sippin’ the Political Tea, Farai and Errin Haines of the 19th welcomed journalist Fernanda Santos to talk about the state of things at the U.S.-Mexico border, and the possibilities of immigration reform under the Biden-Harris administration.

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